Location: US, Jamestown, 52 Newport St

For sale
2 732 737 EUR
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52 Newport St, Jamestown, US
Rooms12
Bathrooms6
Surface of living area479.00 m²

The "Boulders" is a home designed and built by renowned architect, Charles Bevins. Built in 1888 for Professor Charles W. Larned and his wife, Louise, to vacation at when they were away from their home at West Point. They chose the homesite for its beautiful water views. Charles Bevins is primarily responsible for the architecture prevalent throughout Jamestown featuring the 19th century picturesque shingle style design. There are forty buildings attributed to him with several others thought to be of his hand as well. His designs range from the Thorndike Hotel to the Moveable Chapel to the Boulders. Unfortunately, several of his other homes were destroyed to make way for Fort Wetherill. The portrait above the front fireplace, "Old North Wind", is believed to be by famous landscape artist William Trost Richards. Many of his paintings are currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Richards owned a home just across the street in the late 1890s. Indoor plumbing was added to the Boulders in 1892. Since then, the home has changed hands a few times with the current owners purchasing the home in 1993. Until that time, the home was still only being used as a summer cottage. The current owners spared no expense restoring the original Bevins design while also modernizing it for year-round use. Cellulose was blown into the walls and a complete heating and air conditioning system was added. They maintained the integrity of the original design by adhering to architectural elements reminiscent to the late 19th century. For example, all of the vent covers for the HVAC system are black cast iron and are consistent with designs from that time period. The "carriage house"-style garage, added by the current owners, replaces an old carriage house that was destroyed decades earlier. A private guest suite occupies the second floor of the addition. There is also a private staircase for visitors. Access from the home is via a second floor walkway. All of the original 19th century interior woodwork

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Economic residence
Energy inefficient housing
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Low GHG emission
High GHG emission

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